Press Release Distribution
 

Members Login  |  Register  |  Why Join?   Follow us on Google+Follow us on TwitterFind us on LinkedInFind Us on FacebookSubscribe to our RSS FeedsSubscribe to our YouTube ChannelFind us on RebelMouse

Video Releases    |    Pricing & Distribution Plans    |    Today's News    |    News By Category    |    News By Date    |    Business Directory
All Press Releases for January 11, 2014 »
RSS Feeds RSS Feed     Print this news Printer Friendly     Email this news Email It    Create PDF PDF Version   



Modest increase in Social Security Disability payments at outset of 2014

If you are a recipient or potential recipient of disability benefits, there's good news for 2014.
 
x-small text small text medium text large text

    January 11, 2014 /24-7PressRelease/ -- The Social Security Administration administers several different benefit programs. One of the most important is Social Security Disability Insurance. For a worker who has paid Social Security taxes into the system for a long enough time, SSDI benefits may be available to help make ends meet should that worker become afflicted with a physical or mental disability. Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, is another benefit program administered by the Social Security Administration; however, there is no requirement that SSI beneficiaries must have paid into the system through Social Security taxes.

SSDI and SSI beneficiaries receive medical benefits through Medicare or Medicaid, as well as a monthly stipend. In 2014, benefit checks for disabled workers will increase to account for a rising cost of living. But, some are questioning whether the 2014 cost of living -- or COLA -- adjustment is large enough to truly account for the many expenses that come with living with a disability.

Cost of living increase for 2014 reflects low rate of inflation

COLA increases in benefits administered by the Social Security Administration began in 1975. Based on inflation, the COLA increases are adjusted according to an annual Bureau of Labor Statistics report that measures the cost of a variety of consumer products, such as food and gasoline.

For 2014, the COLA increase to Social Security Disability benefits is 1.5 percent. The exact amount of the increase for an individual Social Security beneficiary of course depends on the size of the check he or she is already receiving. For the average disabled worker receiving SSDI benefits, the COLA increase will mean about another $20 per month.

The 1.5 percent bump in Social Security benefits for 2014 is among the lowest COLA increases since benefits started being indexed for inflation in 1975. It also comes close on the heels of two years -- 2010 and 2011 -- in which there were no COLA increases at all.

Get help from an attorney to get quick access to the full disability benefits you need

Even a relatively modest increase is of course better than no increase at all. Yet, those suffering from a disability often incur expenses outside the range of average consumer spending. This makes it all the more important for disabled workers to ensure they get the full benefits they are entitled to, as quickly as possible.

If you are unable to work due to a disability, a Social Security Disability attorney can help you get the full benefits you need in a timely fashion. Talk to an attorney today about your right to benefits.

Article provided by Midwest Disability, P.A.
Visit us at www.midwestdisabilitykansascity.com



---
Press release service and press release distribution provided by http://www.24-7pressrelease.com


# # #

Read more Press Releases from FL Web Advantage:


Contact Information:
FL Web Advantage

E-Mail: Email us Here
Disclaimer:
If you have any questions regarding information in this press release, please contact the person listed in the contact module of this page. Please do not attempt to contact 24-7PressRelease. We are unable to assist you with any information regarding this release. 24-7PressRelease disclaims any content contained in this press release. Please see our complete Terms of Service disclaimer for more information.