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All Press Releases for December 06, 2013 »
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Reduction in truck accidents goal of federal laws

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's new legislation governing the working hours and conditions of truck drivers went into effect earlier this year.
 
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    December 06, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Being the nation's capital, the volume and variety of motor vehicles on the roadways of Washington D.C. is incredible diverse. From limousines to commercial trucks to tourist buses and more, vehicles shuttle hundreds of thousands of people a day. Such a combination does bring with it a natural chance of accidents.

Car accidents can be minor as in the typical fender-bender or they can be serious, resulting in permanent injury or even death. Many things contribute to the severity of an accident including the size of the vehicles involved. Large trucks obviously have the power to create severe damage when a car-truck accident occurs.

Statistics from the Department of Transportation for 2011 report the number of collisions involving trailers or trucks to be more than 2,300 with 804 personal injuries resulting and five people being killed. Numbers like these remind everyone that truck driver safety is of high importance for all and can start with behaviors on the part of truckers.

Federal laws aim to help improve safety

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's new legislation governing the working hours and conditions of truck drivers went into effect earlier this year. The goal is simple--to reduce the instance of truck accidents by reducing fatigue in truck drivers.

As a result of the law, the number of hours that a trucker is allowed to work has been lowered and more stringent guidelines about work breaks are in place. Key components of the new law include
- A trucker can work no more than 14 hours in a 24-hour day.
- Of those 14 hours, a maximum of 11 hours is allowed to be spent driving.
- At least 30 minutes of break time must be taken for every eight hours of recorded work time.
- Before the new law, truckers could work up to 82 hours in a work week. The new law changes that and restricts total work hours to 70 in a given week of work.
- One extended 34-hour rest period per work week is required and must span two unique blocks of time from 1:00 a.m. to 5:00 a.m.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration's estimates indicate that these efforts, if properly followed, will prevent a total of 560 injuries from accidents as well as saving 19 lives that would otherwise be lost in fatal crashes.

Representation is a must

Any accident involving a commercial vehicle, especially if it results in personal injury, should be reported. Additionally, you should always contact an attorney for help in processing your claim and working with the trucker, truck owner and/or trucking company to make sure your rights are properly protected.

Visit us at dc-caraccidentlawyer.com/



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