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Study Finds Outpatient Spinal Surgery Safer

Seattle-based Spine Institute Northwest alerts spine surgery patients to a recent scholarly study that showed that those treated in an outpatient setting were less likely than hospital patients to suffer from complications.
 
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    BOTHELL, WA, March 21, 2013 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Back pain sufferers who need spine surgery now have evidence that outpatient spine surgery is safer, say the physicians at Seattle-based Spine Institute Northwest. They point to a recently published academic study that found that lumbar discectomy patients treated in hospitals experienced complications at an 85 percent greater rate than those treated in an outpatient setting.

Published in the February 1 issue of the scholarly journal Spine, the study -- led by the University of Iowa's Andrew J. Pugely, MD -- examined the records of more than 4,000 lumbar discectomy patients from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQUIP) database. This database combines information from nearly 500 U.S. hospitals with the goal of improving surgical quality and outcomes.

Dr. Pugely and his colleagues used the NSQUIP database to review the cases of 4,310 spine surgery patients from the years 2005 to 2010, looking for the incidence of and risk factors for complications within 30 days of surgery. Nearly two-thirds of the discectomies they examined (2,658 procedures) were performed in an inpatient setting.

The results: After taking into account risk factors like patient age and medical history, patients who received discectomies in hospitals had a complication rate of 6.5%, compared to a rate of 3.5% for those who received outpatient treatment. Patients who underwent spinal surgery in an outpatient setting faced a significantly lower risk of complications such as wound infections or additional surgeries. The study's authors concluded that surgeons should consider outpatient spine surgery for patients who are appropriate candidates.

"This study simply underscores and reinforces our commitment to minimally invasive surgery at Spine Institute Northwest," comments Dr. Solomon Kamson, MD, PhD. "Our philosophy has always been that less is better, utilizing less invasive surgery and treatments to help patients at our outpatient facilities."

About Spine Institute Northwest
Spine Institute Northwest has been providing top-quality healthcare services since 2000. The medical team at Spine Institute Northwest strives to deliver the best medical service and care. Its philosophy places a strong emphasis on early intervention, starting with an accurate diagnosis and initiation of proper treatment. At Spine Institute Northwest, the focus is always on preventing the kind of chronic disability so often associated with untreated or poorly managed, intractable pain. Learn more at www.spineinstitutenorthwest.com.



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Contact Information:
Ben Doty
Spine Institute Northwest

Bothell, WA
USA
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