All Press Releases for May 13, 2014

Biting Back at Malaria Mosquitoes

A novel delivery system for an anti-mosquito drug.



"Once proven safe and effective in humans, our implant could be a useful addition to the mosquito control tools currently used in the fight against malaria."

    PAMPLONA, SPAIN, May 13, 2014 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Researchers from the University of Navarra are working on a silicone implant that aims at making human blood lethal to mosquitoes for months at a time. The small silicone rod is based on a slow-release formulation of ivermectin, a safe drug widely used in the tropics to combat parasitic diseases. The ivermectin implant, which was manufactured in California, is currently undergoing pre-clinical testing in Spain.

The idea originated from the lack of interventions targeting outdoor-biting mosquitoes, a substantial percentage of malaria vectors. The most effective tools currently used are insecticide-impregnated bed nets and indoor-residual spraying of insecticides - both tools that combat indoor-biting mosquitoes. The growing insecticide resistance among mosquitoes in endemic zones, however, hampers malaria eradication efforts.

Spread of drug resistant malaria from South-East Asia needs to be contained to protect our first-line antimalarials. The implant could eventually help by killing mosquitoes feeding on malaria-infected humans and thereby, preventing the spread of drug-resistant parasites.

Venezuelan researcher Dr. Carlos Chaccour says: "Once proven safe and effective in humans, our implant could be a useful addition to the mosquito control tools currently used in the fight against malaria."

After successfully crowdfunding the first part of the study, the researchers obtained very promising preliminary results and would like to raise the rest of the necessary funds through another campaign.

The Malaria MISSION project is featured on Indiegogo's crowdfunding platform. The funding goal is $20,000, which will cover the initial pre-clinical studies lasting one year. - See more at igg.me/at/malariamission.

Dr. Carlos Chaccour, MD, holds an MSc in tropical medicine from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. He has previously worked for several years in rural clinics in the Amazon region of his home country Venezuela.

# # #

Contact Information

Julie Chaccour
Malaria Mission
Pamplona, Navarra
Spain
Voice: +34652814207
E-Mail: Email Us Here
Website: Visit Our Website
Blog: Visit Our Blog
Follow Us:

YOUTUBE VIDEO



Comment on this story...