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All Press Releases for January 24, 2014 »
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Tragic deaths of Oakland teens highlight dangers of teen drivers

While many teenagers are careful drivers and make it through the first few driving years without incident, others are not so lucky.
 
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    January 24, 2014 /24-7PressRelease/ -- Nearly every teenager throughout the country dreams of the day he or she gets a driver's license. This important milestone can also be exciting for parents, but can cause them to worry. While many teenagers are careful drivers and make it through the first few driving years without incident, others are not so lucky. Teenagers cause about 30 percent of total medical car accident costs throughout the U.S., say the Centers for Disease Control. Car crashes are the number one cause of death for teens, accounting for over 2,000 teen deaths and 200,000 injuries every year.

Many of these accidents were merely the result of driver inexperience. It takes time and practice to gain the skills needed to respond to road hazards, make quick decisions to avoid an accident, safely drive at night and recognize the various dangers on the road. Teenagers are also known to avoid wearing their seatbelts, show off for passengers and drive too fast. Unfortunately, a large amount of them also make the decision to drive while intoxicated.

Accident claims lives of four Oakland teenagers

Last February, a 19-year-old boy and his cousins received permission from their parents to drive to Las Vegas for a pro rugby tournament, reported the San Jose Mercury News. On the way back home to Oakland, the boy fell asleep while driving, hit the center divider and flipped. The car had been going nearly 90 miles per hour and several of the teens weren't wearing seatbelts. Tragically, the driver and three of his cousins were killed in the accident.

It's every parent's worst nightmare to lose a child. Some habits can be instilled early in kids, years before they're old enough to drive. This may help them make safe driving decisions later on. State Farm provides the following tips:
- Always wear seatbelts and make sure passengers are buckled up before driving.
- Don't drive while distracted, upset or tired.
- Don't use a cellphone or text and drive.
- Set a good example by driving courteously and following rules.
- Don't speed, drive aggressively or tailgate other drivers.

Before a teenager gets his or her license, it can help to communicate clear expectations and rules about driving.

Even careful drivers can sometimes cause accidents, especially new and inexperienced drivers. Crashes can result in serious injuries and thousands of dollars in medical bills. Accident victims who were hurt because of a careless, negligent or intoxicated driver should contact an experienced personal injury attorney right away to discuss their options, which can include compensation of their medical expenses and other losses.

Visit us at oaklandcaraccidentattorney.org/



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